Archive for June 28th, 2012

28th June 2012, Thursday

RXwildlife has moved

RXwildlife has now moved to a new website.

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rxwildlife.info

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We also now have a facebook page and a twitter feed.

Please reset your bookmarks and rss feeds to the new domain. The original site will remain as an archive for the old posts as it’s a very useful reference of the wildlife seen in the region over the last few years.

The website has been running now for over 7 years since 2nd November 2004 when the first post was added. RXwildlife was one of the first community wildlife blogs, if not the first, and it was about time for a re-vamp and new look. Hopefully we will have another 7+ years of quality wildlife news and comment at the new website.

We hope you enjoy the new website but if you have any suggestions or ideas for improving the site please contact us.

28th June 2012, Thursday

The creature from the pit

A couple of winters ago a small willow dominated pit had its cover of trees removed and the vegetation is still in transition.  A range of ruderal species grow on what was once shaded bare ground around the pit whilst the open water, lacking in aquatic flowering plants, is dominated by filamentous algae, with unicellular algae colouring the water.

pit.jpg

Over time of course the vegetation will settle down and become dominated by the species associated with unshaded wetlands, with seeds lying dormant in the seed bank in the silt at the bottom of the pond providing some of the likely successful species.

The aquatic fauna seems to be on the way to establishing itself too. Peering into the turbid water to see if I could spot one of the medicinal leeches I noticed a few weeks back, subtle movements drew attention to

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28th June 2012, Thursday

Life moves on!

Back in 2008 I wrote about the broom cycle at Dungeness click here.  The last two photos in this post show a broom Cytisus scoparius I got to know well in the 1990s.  It was growing on previously disturbed shingle and was heavily grazed by rabbits, forming a low broom turf.  Then an outbreak of myxomatosis allowed the bush to reach for the skies (the second last photograph in the above post shows this just as time was starting to catch up with this plant and it died).  The final photo shows a number of  seedlings colonising around the remains of the bush, benefitting from the humus it had added to the bare shingle.

Move forward four years and those seedlings have formed several large wood sage Teucrium scorodonia plants.

dead-broom.jpg

The wood sage plants are growing with

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