Archive for October 9th, 2011

9th October 2011, Sunday

Rye Harbour Waders

During yesterday’s Bird Race there were 16 species of wader recorded at Rye Harbour – Green and Common Sandpipers and Curlew at Castle Water, then at the flooded Flat Beach Oystercatcher, Lapwing, Golden, Grey and Ringed Plovers, Snipe, Redshank, Ruff, Sanderling, Dunlin, Little Stint and Buff-breasted Sandpiper, then Turnstone along the river.
And then today at the flooded Flat Beach there was no sign of the Buff-breasted Sandpiper, but in looking there were 2 extra species – Curlew Sandpiper and Purple Sandpiper. The latter species is the rarest of these waders at Rye Harbour and it’s about 10 years since I have seen one here…

9th October 2011, Sunday

RX Bird Race

birdrace-winners.jpg
Yesterday 8 teams tried to see as many bird species as possible within the RX area to raise funds for Mallydams RSPCA and Friends of Rye Harbour Nature Reserve. It was cold, but dry and an amazing 133 species were logged (and there were an extra 10 or so species recorded in the area, but not seen by any of the teams). There was a dead heat with 104 species between Westfield Wildlife (who used a car and travelled widely – read Ralph and Dave’s account here) and the Pett Levellers (who walked to Fairlight, Pett and Rye Harbour – read Cliff’s account of the day here), so the prestigious trophy will be shared until next year’s event…
Back at Mallydams in the evening the teams enjoyed refreshements and a raffle and the whole day raised £350 and all the teams enjoyed the challenge. A BIG THANK-YOU to the sponsors – BLT Hastings, Phil Newton, Bob Greenhalf, In Focus, Feathers Wild Bird Care, Martyn Channons Country Store, Red Lion pub Brede, Rye Cycle Hire and Jempsons – and to all the teams that took part.

9th October 2011, Sunday

Dotted Chestnut

Dotted Chestnut

The last few days of September and early October have been good with four Clifden Nonpareils, a Scarce Bordered Straw and a Vestal in my garden trap near Staplecross, but last night this Dotted Chestnut was the highlight. This Nationally Scarce B species seems to be expanding its range and is described by Colin Pratt in his book as ‘a Sussex speciality, but even here it has always existed at a low density, and has been very local, elusive, and episodic in appearance’.