Archive for September 11th, 2005

11th September 2005, Sunday

Behind the Bund

During the mid-80’s, a granite bund was constructed on the beach at Fairlight Cove in order to impede coastal erosion. A narrow lagoon soon formed behind it, but was always gruesomely littered with sea-borne junk. However, a shingle barrier now protects it and an interesting plant community is developing.
Where seawater floods through between the granite blocks, a little strip of saltmarsh has appeared, with Marsh Samphire, Sea Purslane and Sea Aster. The narrow strip of shingle has Sea Kale, and Rock Samphire. Then there’s a zone dominated by Pampas Grass & Fuchsia at the foot of a garden rubbish chute. At the western end, where perhaps a spring flows in, a reedbed has begun to grow, with phragmites, some kind of rush and reedmace. No doubt there are more interesting plants. I wonder if any botanists have been to look?
It looks just the kind of neglected little spot that would turn up some amazing bird, but the best I could find today were 2 Grey Wagtails and a male Black Redstart, while two Robins were using the granite blocks as song posts.

11th September 2005, Sunday

Pett Level today

Sunday September 11th
Pett Level: a good variety of birds present in spite of miserable weather. I saw 88sp including –
60 Gannets, 20 Wigeon, 1-2 Merlins, 4 Hobbies, 1 Sanderling, 1 Little Stint, 2 Green Sandpipers, 2 Arctic Skuas, 6 Grey Wagtails, 5 Whinchats, 1 Stonechat, 1 Black Redstart, 70+ Siskins>N.…but others saw quite a few species in addition to this. At this time of year, it is possible to see 100sp in a day around the level.

11th September 2005, Sunday

Around Rye Harbour Today

On the shore at low tide: 182 Dunlin, 76 Ringed Plover, 23 Curlew, 15 Knot, 7 Bar-tailed Godwit, 7 Sanderling and 1 Arctic Tern.
At Castle Water: 2 Garganey, 6 Green Sandpiper, 1 Common Sandpiper, 11 Snipe and 20 Wigeon.
On Harbour Farm: 15 Wheatear, 1 Whinchat and 20+ Yellow Wagtail
In addition, 96 Golden Plover roosted on Flat Beach, while 250+ House Martin passed through.

11th September 2005, Sunday

Gorse Spider Mite

These tiny reddish brown mites Tetranychus lintearius can now be found on the Gorse. They live in large colonies that spin webs which completely covers over the Gorse – looking a bit like white “Candy Floss”
Gorse Spider Mites